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Frequently Asked Questions
1. Does the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program accept Freshmen directly into the Program?
No.  The undergraduate DGS Program is a junior/senior program.  Students generally apply into the DGS Program during the second semester of their sophomore year and begin the program in the fall of their junior year.

2. Do applicants have to be accepted into the Department of Allied Health Sciences before they can apply to the DGS Program?
No, students may apply from any major or college at the University if they have met the prerequisite requirements.
 
3. Is there a guaranteed admission program?
Yes. In order to qualify for guaranteed admission a student must:
  • Be admitted to the University of Connecticut as a freshman
  • Complete 3 successive semesters of full-time study of required coursework at the University of Connecticut
  • Submit a Department of Allied Health Sciences application during the fourth full-time semester
  • Earn an overall Grade Point Average of 3.2 or better
  • Meet all other admissions requirements
Students meeting these criteria will be guaranteed admission to the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program. Acceptance does not guarantee admission to the preferred concentration (cytogenetics or molecular diagnostics). This is decided on a competitive space available basis. University of Connecticut students who do not meet these criteria will be reviewed for admissions in a competitive process.
 
4. As a high school senior applying to UConn for the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program, how do I apply initially for my first two years?
Freshman application should be made to the University of Connecticut. You may apply directly into the Department of Allied Health Sciences (DAHS) as an undeclared major, or declare any other major at the University.
 
If you applied directly into the DAHS you will be assigned to an Allied Health Sciences advisor for undeclared students, once admitted to the University. The Allied Health advisors are knowledgeable about prerequisite requirements for the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program, as well as the University requirements for graduation.
 
If you declare another major, you will be assigned another advisor at the University; however, it is recommended that you meet with an AHS advisor before applying to the DGS Program to be certain you are meeting the DGS prerequisites.

5. Does the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program accept transfer students into the Program?
Yes. Transfer applications are reviewed on a space available basis once matriculated University of Connecticut students have been reviewed and offers of admission have been confirmed. Transfer students must first be admissible to the University of Connecticut before they can be offered admission to the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program.

6. Does the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program accept second degree students who already hold a Bachelors degree or higher?
Yes, provided they have completed the appropriate prerequisite course work. These students may also consider applying to the post-baccalaureate certificate programs in cytogenetics and molecular diagnostics.
 
7. Is there a non-degree option in the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program for individuals already possessing a baccalaureate degree?
Yes. The Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program offers a post-baccalaureate certificate program with two concentrations; one in cytogenetics and one in molecular diagnostics. These are open to students holding a Bachelors degree in medical technology, biology, or a related discipline and who have met specified prerequisite coursework. The two-year program includes a 6-month, full-time internship component; The coursework is the same as for the undergraduate program. Upon completion, students will receive a certificate from the College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources.

8. How many students are accepted into the Diagnostic Genetic Science Program annually?
The usual class size is 16 students per year.  About two-thirds of these are admitted into the cytogenetics concentration, and one-third into the molecular diagnostics concentration.
 
9. How often during the year students admitted to the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program?
Applications for undergraduate and certificate admissions are due by February 1st for matriculation the following Fall semester.  Late applications are reviewed on a space available basis until the class is filled.

10. How many credits do I need to be eligible for admission as a junior?
Although there is no absolute number of credits required for admission to the junior year, students MUST have completed specific prerequisite courses and have earned approximately 60 credits.
 
11. When must prerequisite course work be completed to be eligible for admission?
Students must have completed the prerequisite requirements prior to the beginning of the Fall semester for which they are applying, unless other arrangements have been made with the Program Director. Failure to meet all prerequisites prior to matriculation may result in the delay of graduation.

12. Is there a requirement for volunteer experience prior to application?
No. However, it is suggested that students acquaint themselves with the field by visiting, volunteering, or working in a laboratory.

13. Is a personal interview required?
No. A personal interview with the Program Director or a member of the faculty of the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program is not required, but is recommended and may be helpful in particular cases.
 
14. What applications need to be filed when applying to the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program?
Applicants to the undergraduate program must submit the Allied Health Professional Programs application no later than February 1st for admission the following Fall. These are available on the Department of Allied Health Sciences website (See Admissions). Late applications will be accepted on a space available basis.
 
Applications to the DGS certificate program are due no later than February 1st for admission the following Fall. These are available on the Department of Allied Health Sciences website (See Admissions). Late applications are accepted on a space available basis.
 
In addition to the Allied Health application, transfer applicants must also file a University Application for Undergraduate Admission. These are available through the University Admissions Office (http://admissions.uconn.edu/). Please refer to that application for the deadline for application to the University.
 

DGS Program Contact Information:

 

Martha Keagle, MEd, CT(ASCP)CGCM

Program Director

Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Program

358 Mansfield Rd. Unit 1101

Storrs, CT 06269

860-486-0036

martha.keagle@uconn.edu

 

 

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Department of Allied Health Sciences
College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources
358 Mansfield Road, Unit 1101
Storrs, Connecticut 06269-1101
Telephone: (860) 486-2834
Fax: (860) 486-5375